Swift bird

Swift, any of about 75 species of agile, fast-flying birds of the family Apodidae (sometimes Micropodidae), in the order Apodiformes, which also includes the hummingbirds. The family is divided into the subfamilies Apodinae, or soft-tailed swifts, and Chaeturinae, or spine-tailed swifts.Swift, any of about 75 species of agile, fast-flying birds of the family Apodidae (sometimes Micropodidae), in the order Apodiformes, which also includes the hummingbirds. The family is divided into the subfamilies Apodinae, or soft-tailed swifts, and Chaeturinae, or spine-tailed swifts.
Large numbers of swifts gather in the sky to feed on flying insects. They are medium-sized aerial birds, which are superb fliers.

Female elephants spend their entire lives living together with other females and calves. These family groups are led by a single elephant, known as the matriarch, who is usually the oldest female. Male elephants will live with the herd until they are about 13 years old. Once they get to this age, they leave the herd and mainly live alone for the rest of their life. Elephants can live up to 70 years old in the wild.

Amboseli National Reserve

Crowned by Mount Kilimanjaro , Africa’s highest peak, Amboseli National Reserve is one of Kenya’s most popular tourist parks. The name “Amboseli” comes from a Maasai word meaning “salty dust,” an apt description for the park’s parched conditions. The reserve is one of the best places in Africa to view large herds of elephants up close. Other wildlife commonly spotted in the park includes big cats, such as lion and cheetah, as well as giraffe, impala, eland, waterbuck, gazelle, and more than 600 species of birds. Nature lovers can explore five different habitats here, ranging from the dried-up bed of Lake Amboseli , wetlands with sulfur springs, savannah, and woodlands.The park is 39,206 hectares (392 km2; 151 sq mi)[1] in size at the core of an 8,000 km2 (3,100 sq mi) ecosystem that spreads across the Kenya-Tanzania border.
ThNe park is 39,206 hectares (392 km2; 151 sq mi)[1] in size at the core of an 8,000 km2 (3,100 sq mi) ecosystem that spreads across the Kenya-Tanzania border.